Australian music industry under review for ‘sexual harm, sexual harassment and systemic discrimination’

Australian music industry under review for ‘sexual harm, sexual harassment and systemic discrimination’


The Australian music industry is present process a six-month review by two consultants wanting into incidences of “sexual harm, sexual harassment and systemic discrimination”.

The National Music Industry Review is being led by two consultants, Alexandra Shehadie and Sam Turner, who will start the preliminary phases of the investigation this month, and plan to finish their work in June 2022.

Recommendations will then be made to corporations within the Australian industry, designed to “ensure [the] music industry has a safe, respectful and inclusive culture”.

The consultants say they are going to be acquiring info from a variety of people from throughout report labels, publishers, artists, artist managers, brokers, competition and manufacturing employees, and others.

They add that the Review “will not investigate any individual incident but will be a broad cultural review [and] will be an opportunity for people to share their stories, have their voices heard, and propose ideas on how the industry can be a safer, more inclusive and respectful workplace”.

The ultimate report won’t title people nor alleged perpetrators.

“The objective is to hear the stories and experiences of music professionals from all corners of the contemporary music industry to inform a deep understanding of the issues at play, and recommend areas for reform,” says an FAQ doc. “The report will share de-identified stories, with the permission of the person involved.”

The National Music Industry Review can be comprised of: (i) A nationwide survey; (ii) A confidential on-line written submissions course of; (iii) Focus teams throughout a variety of areas and demographics; (iv) Confidential one-on-one interviews.

“Warner Music welcomes this opportunity to engage with the wider industry to share what we’ve been doing, to learn from others, and to continue to grow to create an environment where we all feel safe, heard and respected.”

Dan Rosen, Warner Music Australia

Its arrival has been welcomed by Dan Rosen, President of Warner Music Australasia, who stated: “There has never been a more important time to recognise that the responsibility falls on each of us to evolve and be positive participants in the change that our industry needs.

“Warner Music welcomes this opportunity to engage with the wider industry to share what we’ve been doing, to learn from others, and to continue to grow to create an environment where we all feel safe, heard and respected.”

Hannah Pehi, Warner Music Australasia’s Head of People and Culture, added: “An important step in resetting our industry as a whole is to understand all the factors that have led us to where we are today. We welcome the opportunity to support change and will do all we can to help shape a better future for the Australian music industry.”

“Universal Music Australia is committed to achieving this lasting change and fully supports this initiative as one part of that effort.”

George Ash, Universal Music Australia

George Ash, President, Universal Music Asia Pacific, stated of the Review: “Everyone deserves a work environment that is respectful, safe, inclusive and equitable. This independent and transparent nationwide review is an important step towards achieving that goal – not only in music but also as an example for progress across broader society.

“Universal Music Australia is committed to achieving this lasting change and fully supports this initiative as one part of that effort.”

In January, Warner Music fired senior A&R government Scott Maclachlan following an inner investigation into alleged sexual harassment.

Another senior government within the Oz enterprise, Tony Glover, was fired by Sony Music in April following an unbiased investigation linked to allegations of sexual harassment and bullying. Glover initially denied these allegations.

In June, Sony Music Australia parted methods with its long-time CEO and Chairman, Denis Handlin, who has been accused by a number of workers of fostering a poisonous office tradition, and of office bullying. Handlin has not been accused of any sexual harassment or assault.

In July, Universal Music Australia’s President, George Ash, knowledgeable his firm that UMG was launching its personal unbiased investigation into office tradition following anonymised allegations of impropriety on the agency.

“As the leader of this company I take full responsibility for creating a respectful workplace culture for everyone,” Ash wrote in an e mail to employees.

“With respect to my own behaviour, it is particularly painful to realise now that what I intended as jokes were unacceptable comments that made some of you uncomfortable.”

And earlier this month, Mushroom Group introduced it was parting methods with dwell enterprise Harbour Agency, after an investigation was launched into the latter agency linked to claims from former Harbour Agency employees on previous administration habits and office tradition.

The Music Industry Review is being supported by two Australian accumulating societies – APRA AMCOS and PPCA – in addition to report industry commerce group ARIA, and music industry charity Support Act.Music Business Worldwide

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